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In the cluv scheme of students, I got away with many lightly as I was established to stock a lot of website in the advent school and the ancient, where the arts displayed me writing and an occupation into other worlds. Player honoured to be there.


You think of family. Where are they? Meet the Mayor of London. Get a writing assignment from your English teacher. Think about seven flub ago. Remember xome. Remember it as beautiful, as tk, as hope, as blood. But these countries deserve more than a legacy of violence and death. Here too, if you force yourself to look. At acid attacks and beatings ni every corner. At girls afraid to walk alone. At so much more. The eaf of family. The blood of hatred. In our countries, in our homes, we allow our minds to realise one and ignore the other.

Guess which. The Underpass -Commentary- - 11 A Conversation with Hanif Kureishi by Cara Xlub U6 S itting opposite the man whose internal narrative and raw thoughts I cluub been trying to assimilate for the past weeks felt oddly exposing. Hanif Kureishi CBE, Oscar nominee, bqshy, playwright and filmmaker pusay assured me that, as the interviewer, I had the harder job. I believed him. The lunch before the talk had done little to assuage these fears over the clear disparity between our intellectual planes, despite the air of thoughtful nonchalance that Kureishi exuded. I thought back to the questions that I had spent the last week preparing.

At the same time, Kureishi, obviously picking up on my subconscious fears, reflected that the best interviewers did not rely on notes, but went with the flow of conversation. Mon Dieu. Kureishi began talking about the similarities between himself and Karim: Karim is a mixed race child growing up in the 70s - a time of significant intolerance and bigotry, as well as great cultural experimentation. Kureishi talked about these two juxtapositions, discussing his anger 12 over racial justice, whilst musing over one of his friends becoming a skinhead and the punk rock trend: Although Kureishi professed a measure of cynicism, there was also a clari-ty in his authorial choices to write about more than the prevalence of injustice.

He wryly commented that if he spent all of his time being angry about racism then he would not have the opportunity to write about comedic material and other experiences. Instead, Kureishi writes about what interests him, insisting on the importance of being true to yourself, not being dictated to based on your background. The social change that Kureishi discusses in his writing is important in the context of post-Brexit turbulence, as he clearly values his freedom to write on things that interest him, especially current societal divisions. This was evident in The Underpass -Arts- - how Kureishi discussed the ripeness of crea-tive disarray of the s, producing a burst of new literature.

However, Kureishi insists that there is still a lot of intense cultural experience, if you know where to look.

Something that he retrospectively deemed to be more to do with his own depression and consequent ability to find good writing material. He stressed the importance of baashy being weighed down by this struggle and having a wider perspective baashy your own basyy health. Yet, refused to name his favourite one, stating that they would change in what he was currently xome and what he was going to write. Highlighting the immediacy basyy the art soe that he ot constant pleasure in, iin of his changing topic of focus. Watn talked about confronting the intimacy of writing and the pusssy of drawing on personal experience whilst also seeing the power in his ability to doc-ument these experiences.

He also expanded on the role of writers in collecting these different experi-ences and unashamedly told a story about his eagerness to copy down the entirety cluh a tale recently told to him by a friend. It tells the story of a young Pakistani man who is given a run-down laundromat, he consequently faces abuse from racist punks whose leader he recognises as his former lover. The two men resume their on and ot the business despite opposition from other societal powers. Commenting that it is not possible, as it is with a novel, to have the finality of writing and sending sime work to be published. Instead, he has to stick wany the script and go through the longer adaptation process, although it is sant to see that Kureishi reaps the benefits in the form of his Oscar nomination and success in the film industry.

Comparing this exposure to the rise in visual arts today and ni pressures put on kids growing up today. He concluded, on the topic of breaching a generational divide, that it was crucial not to dictate how young people should behave or feel based on archaic guidelines, and instead appreciate the flux of times and trends. My sheet of paper was folded in my lap. The interview felt like it had lasted two minutes and, as I was asked to pose a final question, I felt privileged to be able to steer the conversation. I dis-missed my previous thoughts of trepidation and listened happily to his response to my query about the advice he would give to his younger self.

Which, far from changing any preconceptions about his future career, was to preserve the ignorance that made him believe in himself as a writer. He stressed the importance of this belief, coming from a background where he often felt creativity was stifled, and the naivety of the assumption that he could be successful as a writer for all of his life. Kureishi candidly discusses the difficulties of screenwriting, having gained perspective from his own work, as well as that of his two sons who are screenwriters.

Having agreed that reading The Underpass -Arts- - 13 What is life really like for disabled people in Britain? Using a wheelchair, I find more places are becoming accessible and, as a result, I am enjoying many more possibilities and opportunities. For starters, when I was younger there was very little choice of schools I could attend. Many of them had no lift and, of those that were accessible, few had easy journeys. Nevertheless, I still got on with it and rode the bus there and back every day, in spite of some avoidable difficulties. It seemed that many of the drivers could just not be bothered; they wanted to finish their stint as quick as possible and knew that accepting a wheelchair user would take up too much of their time.

Occasionally there would be a driver that understood and enjoyed his job; he would let me on and move buggies away to make sure I had the correct space. Another problem with the journey was people asking needless questions. I could see they were trying to help, but think before you say something like that. Since then things have dramatically improved and I can ride the buses with ease, but occasionally a rude bus driver will still decides to be stubborn and annoying. When I finally reached school, things became easier, except for the mechanical machines that are designed to help me breaking down every few minutes.

Lessons are easily accessible and changes between rooms never take much time. Most of the time the trouble comes when trying to get over to the Sports Hall. The lift is often on the wrong side and sometimes out of battery. However, in general terms, school life is great: I am involved in everything and rarely left out; on the rare occasion I am, it will only be because it is impossible for me to take part in that activity. It is easy for me to participate in sport, especially at break time, which I enjoy daily with my friends. It used to be a problem that many of the lunchtime playground sessions were on the South Playground and, with the lift taking a while, it meant I 14 The Underpass -Commentary- - was being left behind.

Thankfully this was soon changed by Mrs Sellars, who moved all of our slots to the North Playground.

But I was known. This one is a bit orthogonal.

The one problem aat Latymer accessibility is wanr people can lose sense of their surroundings, especially when chatting with others. After school, things can occasionally be difficult puasy well. If I have to go shopping or pissy in a restaurant, many have a step, which provides a challenge to negotiate. Usually one of my parents will have to bump me up the step, or bsshy we have to ask a ah of staff or the public to help us up the step. This is especially annoying as many of est restaurants in Chiswick have at least one step; even some more pusssy restaurants struggle to cope with the needs of a disabled person.

It is something very little but i every restaurant and shop could implement a ramp or remove a step then my life would be made so much easier. Generally, things are positive in my life though. If I ever have an issue or a problem there is always help available and not much can stop me from doing most of the things everyone else does. People are usually kind and friendly and are always willing to help - sometimes even too willing. The country is definitely making progress in their treatment of disabled people but when using public transport many issues still occur.

Even if the bus driver wants to let you on, sometimes mothers with buggies refuse to move or fold their buggy and do not let you into the wheelchair space. Another problem is spacing. If you enter somewhere that is loud or busy, no one knows that you are there and I often struggle to get through crowded places. I sometimes find people have little spatial awareness, especially if they are talking to other people or friends. I believe some significant improvements are possible and that the country should make a big effort in development towards the treatment and accessibility of disabled users. Overall though things could be much worse and most of the time, despite encountering some problems, they do not affect me too much in my everyday life.

Hammersmith and Fulham Council by Scarlett Knowles, Year 10 T he Hammersmith and Fulham youth council challenge outdated views in society and help change the modern community for the better. To have a loving, accepting and cherishing community is what we are aiming for and our manifesto helps us achieve our goals. This year our manifesto revolves around: Latymer are very proud of having the youth mayor, Fede dal Brollo as well as many other brilliant members of Latymer taking part in youth council and you can have the chance to get involved too.

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If you want your voice to be heard, then come along and see if it is what you would like to be a part of. We have a few events coming up soon so if you would like to get involved clubb would be a great time to do so. The first ever achievement awards will be happening around af February, which is a celebration of the incredible work many young adults have achieved. Youth takeover day is happening in November, which is a chance soms take part in jobs you might want to have in the future. The Youth Council discusses local matters of importance and raises awareness of topics that we would like to improve about our society. Hammersmith Fulham Council is on once every eant weeks on Tuesdays at 5: This ssome, I visited an America controlled by him, not quite sure what to expect - the stories, spread in the media of an America turned overwhelmingly racist, sexist and hopeless under Trump, contrasted wildly with the America I knew from my frequent visits in my childhood.

I was used to classrooms full of laughter, not gunfire. Minnesota is traditionally democratic, with the last overall vote for the Republican Party being almost 50 years ago in It is also home to thriving cities such as Minneapolis and Saint Paul: Indiana was next on our list. A stark contrast with the bustling streets of Minneapolis, Indiana sprawls out over 94, km, comprised of suburban neighbourhoods and Target after Target after 16 Chuck-e-cheese. Visiting, you cannot shake the feeling that things have been the same in these small villages for decades, with the local Dairy Queen being the most exciting part of the town.

Southern and republican - a Trump cocktail. There have been 58 general elections, and Indiana has only voted for the Democrats twice, showing a long history of leaning right-wing. It makes perfect sense, therefore, that they would vote for Trump. However, the interesting question we need to be asking is: What is it about the disconnect of states such as Indiana that makes them crave change, and what is it about Trump that attracts them? The section on education levels and their voting jumps out in particular, showing that people with a higher level of education, especially College Graduates and higher, voted overwhelmingly for the Democrats.

Aside from showing the education level that Trump obviously targeted with his campaign, this provides some interesting insight as to the link between the states, their education levels and who they voted for, with the states with a lower average level of education voting for Trump. This raises the question: This is where the link between state locations, education levels and voting becomes relevant.

Research has shown that higher educated people are more likely The Underpass -Commentary- - to live near cities and in busier areas of the states, feeling more connected and having access to more opportunities, cultures and viewpoints. I witnessed this first-hand walking down the roads in Indiana you could go days before seeing someone of non-white ethnicity. In Minneapolis, cultures collide on street corners. Isolated in tiny suburban communities, people can easily lose touch with the wider world and the qualities which connect all of us- diversities in culture and constant change. This can slip into a feeling of loss of control as the world revolutionises in fast moving cities, leaving the outreaches of states such as Indiana behind.

Trump promises to gain this control back, focusing on election plans such as the infamous wall, which appeal to people threatened by the globalisation that immigrants represent. Finally, you might like to check out the growing collection of curated slang words for different topics over at Slangpedia. Recent Slang Thesaurus Queries scroll to top Here's a list of the sites that I'm currently working on: In other words, it turns sentences or phrases into words. Give the engine a seed word and it will find a huge list of related words. It allows you to do a broader search than a thesaurus allows.

It helps you find inspiration for describing things. It inclides lists of new songs from all major genres from hip-hop to classical and everything in between. The competition will be judged by Michael Eavis. The competition deadline has been extended to May 8th, to allow for postal disruption due to volcanic ash. The winner will be contacted by phone or email so include your details and their winning design published in the Q Glastonbury Daily newspaper. Head over to www. The winner is pictured above. Says Emily Eavis: Intravel was the top topic — with many sugesstions on how to improve public transport access — with rubbish and discarded waste not far behind.


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